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Will there be a shift in The UK’s politics after Brexit delays

Brexit for many has been almost a mythical idea as of late, what seemed like a seemingly simple vote for many in 2016 still to this day is as relevant as ever. Despite the fact, the sitting UK government was confident in the preliminary phases that we would be able to be out of the EU by March 31, 2019, it was subsequently never to be. Amongst the almost comical daily news coverage of how Theresa May’s government was handling the leaving process, there arose the cruel reality to those who voted leave that the government would not be able to smoothly separate us from the EU and as a result, there was going to be a long extension on the process.

Brexit Delays

As time passed early indications were that it would be a month or so, however amongst the rigmorale the UK government settled on a single date, the 31st of October 2019. This colossal delay seems to have had one fatal oversight, that being the negative sentiment it has left towards the majority voter share that had voted to leave the European Union in the first place.

Whether you blive that the extension is necessary from the government or not, on the brexiteer side it is clear what sort of impression this has left, that the conservative party has completely ignored the will of the people and actually is just lengthening the exit in hopes public sentiment changes to ensure that we don’t leave at all.

Changes in voting behaviour

One outcome of the extension has been a surge in public opinion swinging wildly away from the conservative party, however it doesn’t stop there, public sentiment is also pointing towards the likelihood that voters in years to come may once again start protest votes such as they did with UKIP in the 2015 general election where the UKIP party garnered a 12.7 per cent of the total votes. However, as we saw in the one seat that they gained the first past the post system never favoured a high vote count unless you were labour or conservative. However, there is not really any viable debate on whether the conservatives or labour could lose a general election to a smaller party, what can be discussed however is the voting intention of the European elections which as a result of the Brexit delay we will now be a part of and the local elections due to take place in May.

Whilst the local elections should and for the most part have been about the local issues on your respective councils and cities it is more than likely that Brexit, still fresh on the mind of the everyday person will also be a strong contributing factor. it’s more than likely that across the country conservatives will run into losses, and especially in areas where there are councillors who represent smaller less mainstream parties, such as UKIP and other new breed movements.

European Elections

Even more interesting is the resounding preliminary success of the newly founded Brexit Party which has been set up by Nigel Farage in hopes to cause shockwaves to the Conservatives and Labour in the European Elections. the reason the European elections could be of importance is for the few months that the MEP’s will be in there they will have a brilliant opportunity to argue for Brexit on the centre stage. At the moment it seems the Brexit Party is on track to upset both Labour and the Conservatives stealing a big share of their current seats. A few polls are even pointing to the possibility that the voter turnout may be much higher, normally this would be of the advantage of the established parties, however, it seems as though in this case many of these voters are going to be protest voters looking to send a message to Theresa May and the conservative party.

Let us know how you feel about the future of voting, do yuo feel that with the way the Conservatives and Labour have squabbled over Brexit has paved the way for there to be a new type of political system introduced that is fairer and represents the voters better.

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